Skip to main content

I have a dream...

On a social media page with fellow doulas, the question was asked "What would be one thing that you wish you could change about birth or postpartum in your area of the world".

Just one thing?  My immediate thought went to providing wireless monitors for all birthing facilities.  Restriction of movement during labor prevents baby's normal progression towards birth and limits comfort measures for the mother as well.

But the question got me thinking about what I really would like to see happen here in Indiana, in Tippecanoe County, Lafayette, and my neighborhood.

The Big picture?

I wish that pregnancy, birth and postpartum was something that was celebrated and supported.  I wish it wasn't treated as an illness that needs to be treated and recovered from as soon as possible.  I wish the family dynamic was respected and supported.  Paid leave allowing for time for bonding, establishment of secure breastfeeding, recovery of birth, adjustment to parenthood; all without stress of wondering how bills will be paid.

Local view?
Expanding the model of midwifery care in the local hospitals and a freestanding birth center.  I would love to see a sustainable model for a pregnancy support center.  Classes of yoga, childbirth education, breastfeeding consultations, postpartum support groups with a certified counselor, a shop to sell truly useful items in parenthood like baby carriers, cloth diapers, and more.  I would love to train other doulas and create a strong collective of doulas making sure there is a doula for every woman who wants one.


My neighborhood?
Create a culture where breastfeeding is normal as long as mom and baby desire to continue.  Support is given not only in the first weeks after birth, but throughout the first year.  Parents are encouraged instead of criticized for their parenting choices.  The question "Is baby sleeping through the night" would never be uttered. 

It starts with us
All of these ideas are big and grand and important... and also daunting.  Some requiring big culture changes and lots of money.  Others are smaller and just require intentional efforts.  Where we will be in 5-10 years will depend greatly on what people place value.  I hope through my work, that I can convince one birth at a time that BIRTH really does matter.

www.gracioushandsdoula.com

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

The night the Operating Room went dark…

Have you ever seen an OR room with the lights turned off?Everything put away in its place?All is clean and sterile?All is quiet?Empty…?

I must confess that in my own experience I had never seen it happen.I am sure it is the case; an ordinary occurrence for the staff of the hospitals.But for me, my view of an OR has been quite different.
When I visualize an OR, it is bright, filled with people, lots of noises, and it is very cold.You often see more of the ceiling than you do of the floor, or even the surrounding walls.The color of blue scrubs and screens fill one’s view.
And yet…there was the night the OR went dark.
It was a late night supporting a client that needed baby delivered in a hurry.Everyone was prepped, mom was taken in, baby made her arrival, and mom slowly rejoined the conscious world as she felt her baby on her chest.
I notice over my shoulder that staff were finishing up in the OR.Everything prepared for the next possible surgery and then they left and turned off the lights.D…

One moment at a time….Moving through life, birth, and motherhood in its own time

One moment at a time…. Moving through life, birth, and motherhood in its own time
As a mother of three, I often find myself standing in front of a laundry basket full of clean clothing waiting to be folded and put away into their appropriate homes around the house.Folding is not one of my favorite chores, and I am happy when my husband shares the load with me.But, as I am often the one home during the day, the task often falls to me.


The folding in itself isn’t hard.It is the thoughts of everything else that needs to be done that leads to my aggravation.The other day while folding a basket of underwear (aka matching sock roulette) my mind was busy calculating what else I could get done in the next hour.There was dinner to prep, an assignment to finish, an email to send, a Bible study to read, dishes to put away, and much more.I started worrying that I wouldn’t be able to get everything done in my self-imposed time frame.And then I looked down and realized I still needed to first finish…

An Insider’s Guide to Birth at…  IU Arnett Hospital

An Insider’s Guide to Birth at…
IU Arnett Hospital
In my doula career I have supported birth in a variety of facilities.That said, I most often find myself at IU Arnett Hospital in my role of doula.My personal experience also includes the three deliveries of my own children.I also volunteer as a leader for the breastfeeding support group.


IU Arnett is located at 5165 McCarty Lane, Lafayette, IN 47905.The hospital is known for their birthing tubs, midwives, specialists in obstetrics, and their Riley NICU.
Checking In
When it is time to head to the hospital for delivery, especially after regular office hours, moms are directed to check in at the Emergency Department Desk.Once checked in and paperwork signed, a nurse from the Labor and Delivery will come down and meet you and escort you upstairs.A wheelchair will be offered, but many moms prefer to walk instead of sitting while in labor.A quick trip upstairs to the third floor will bring you to one of the seven labor and delivery rooms.
The l…